SR5:Combat Rules:Weapon Stats

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5th Edition Rules
Basics Combat Magic Matrix Driving Character Creation
Armor Weapons Elemental Damage Modifiers Called Shots Martial Arts

Firearms

FIRING MODES
MODE ATTACK ACTION DEFENSE MODIFIER ROUNDS USED NOTES
Single-Shot (SS) Single Shot Simple 0 1 No Recoil
Semi-Automatic (SA) Single Shot Simple 0 1
Semi-Automatic (SA) Semi-Automatic Burst (SB) Complex -2 3
Burst-Fire (BF) Burst Fire (SB) Simple -2 3
Burst-Fire (BF) Long Burst (LB) Complex -5 6
Full-Auto (FA) Full Auto Simple -5 6
Full-Auto (FA) Full Auto Complex -9 10
Full-Auto (FA) Suppressive Fire Complex Drop Prone Or Dive For Cover 20 No Recoil

Recoil Compensation

RECOIL COMPENSATION COMPATIBILITY
THIS OPTION ... DOES NOT STACK WITH ...
Bipod Foregrip, Gyro Mount, Sling, Tripod, Underbarrel Weight
Folding Stock Hip Pad Bracing System, Shock Pad, Sling
Foregrip Bipod, Gyro Mount, Tripod, Underbarrel Weight
Gyro Mount Bipod, Foregrip, Tripod, Sling, Underbarrel Weight
Hip Pad Bracing System Folding Stock, Shock Pad, Sling
Shock Pad Folding Stock, Hip Pad Bracing System, Sling
Sling Bipod, Folding Stock, Gyro Mount, Hip Pad Bracing System, Shock Pad, Tripod, Underbarrel Weight
Tripod Bipod, Foregrip, Gyro Mount, Sling, Underbarrel Weight
Underbarrel Weight Bipod, Foregrip, Gyro Mount, Sling, Tripod
RECOIL COMPENSATION COMPATIBILITY
ACCESSORY BIPOD FOLDING STOCK FOREGRIP GYRO MOUNT HIP PAD BRACING SYSTEM SHOCK PAD SLING TRIPOD UNDERBARREL WEIGHT
Bipod No Yes No No Yes Yes No No No
Folding Stock Yes No Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes
Foregrip No Yes No No Yes Yes Yes No No
Gyro Mount No Yes No No Yes Yes No No No
Hip Pad Bracing System Yes No Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes
Shock Pad Yes No Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes
Sling No No Yes No No No No No No
Tripod No Yes No No Yes Yes No No No
Underbarrel Weight No Yes No No Yes Yes No No No

Recoil compensation is important to anyone who likes to fill the air with lead. There are a number of options to reduce your recoil, but they are not all compatible with each other. Here's a quick list of those options and which of the other options do not stack with them. Remember that as with other accessories and modifications, accessories are also not compatible with each other — you can not put the same item on twice and expect to double the benefit

Thrown Weapons

Shuriken

Can Ready 2 * AGI Shuriken Per Ready Weapon Action

Throwing Knives

Can Ready 2 * AGI Throwing Knives Per Ready Weapon Action

Grenades

When throwing a grenade, choose a location as a target. Use a Throw Weapon Simple Action and make a Throwing Weapons + Agility [Physical] (3) Test modified for range and all the usual conditions. Success means the grenade lands right where you wanted. If you do not meet the threshold, the grenade scatters. The GM determines scatter by consulting the Scatter Table (p. 182). Three hits on the test means no scatter, but it is still possible to hit the target if the scatter roll is low and the thrower got some hits (see Determine Scatter, p. 182). This all goes back to the old saying: "Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades."

Grenades are small, self-contained explosive or gas delivery packages. They may come with a built-in timer to detonate after a pre-set amount of time (usually three seconds), a motion-sensor set to detonate on impact, or a wireless link set to detonate upon remote command. The type of detonation device determines the special rules and timing of grenade explosions.

Built-in Timer:

This detonation method uses the Attacker's Initiative Score as the determining factor for detonation. The grenade is thrown during the character's Action Phase and detonates in the next Combat Turn on the Initiative Score in which it was thrown minus 10, regardless of any additional changes to the thrower's Initiative Score.

Motion Sensor:

Grenades using a motion sensor are extremely dangerous. Once armed (about a second after the sensor is activated) the grenade explodes after any sudden stop or change in direction, meaning hitting the wall, floor, or target. This method uses the standard Ranged Attack rules but adds an extra step if it misses the target (no net hits on the attack roll). After a failed attack roll, the thrower must roll for scatter and the grenade scatters the full amount before exploding immediately. A glitch on the attack roll means the grenade does not detonate on initial impact but instead doubles the scatter distance and explodes. A Critical Glitch means the thrower waited too long, and the throw sets off the grenade. The grenade detonates immediately, affecting the attacker and those around him. (Warned you it was dangerous.)

Wireless Link:

This is the safest way to throw a grenade in some aspects, but it also comes with some risk and effort. The thrower (or anyone else who has a mark on the grenade) can detonate it by a wireless link. This requires the attacker to have a direct neural interface to the linked device and use the Change Wireless Device Mode Free Action. This method also reduces scatter. Without a DNI the attacker must use the Change Linked Device Mode Simple Action in their next or any of their subsequent Action Phases to detonate the grenade and scatter is not reduced.

Grenades Launchers, Rockets, & Missiles

When you fire a grenade, rocket, or missile you use a Fire Weapon Simple Action and roll a Heavy Weapons + Agility [Accuracy] (3) Test modified for range and all the usual conditions. Success means the launched weapon hits right where you wanted. If you do not meet the threshold, the projectile scatters. The GM determines scatter by consulting the Scatter Table.

Projectile Triggers

Much like thrown grenades, projectile explosives have a variety of triggering mechanisms. Timers, wireless detonators, and impact triggers/motion sensors can all be used with projectile explosives. All methods still utilize the scatter rules (if a bit modified for the motion sensor) since these weapons all have some inherent level of inaccuracy.

Built-in Timer:

This detonation method uses the attackers Initiative Score as the determining factor for detonation. The weapon is launched during the characters Action Phase and detonates in the next Combat Turn on the same Initiative Score in which it was fired minus 10, regardless of any changes to the Attacker's Initiative Score.

Motion Sensor:

Projectile explosives using a motion sensor or impact trigger are extremely dangerous. Once armed (after the projectile has traveled 5 meters unless the safety features are disarmed), the projectile explodes after any sudden stop or change in direction, meaning hitting the wall, floor, or target. This method uses the standard Ranged Attack rules but adds an extra step if it misses the target (no net hits on the attack roll). After a failed attack roll, you must roll for scatter and the projectile scatters the full amount before exploding immediately. A glitch on the attack roll means the projectile does not detonate on initial impact and scatters further, double the scatter distance. A Critical Glitch means the arming mechanism misfires and the explosive detonates immediately, affecting the attacker and those around him. (Did we mention these things are extremely dangerous?)

Wireless Link:

This is the safest way to launch a weapon but requires a little extra effort. The firer (or anyone else who has the projectile subscribed to their PAN) can detonate the projectile wirelessly. This requires the attacker to have a direct neural interface to the linked device and use the Change Wireless Device Mode Free Action. This method also reduces scatter. Without a DNI the attacker must use the Change Linked Device Mode Simple Action in their next or any of their subsequent Action Phases to detonate the projectile, but the scatter distance is not reduced.

Scatter

If the attacker misses their intended landing spot, the GM must determine the projectile's scatter. The GM determines the direction of the scatter by rolling 2D6 and consulting the Scatter Diagram. The 7 arrow indicates the direction of the launch, so a result of 7 means the projectile continued on past the target, while a result of 12 or 2 means the projectile scatters back in the direction of the attacker.

Having determined the direction of the scatter, the GM calculates the distance. The Scatter Table indicates a number of dice rolled based on the projectile, which is reduced by the number of hits the attacker rolled. This is used to determine the final scatter distance. If the scatter distance is reduced to 0 or less, the projectile hits the target exactly. (Note that additional hits do not add to Damage Values).

Bows & Crossbows

TODO